TerraCycle

TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit

$ 20.00
  • TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company
TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit-Recumbent Accessories-The Electric Spokes Company

TerraCycle

TerraCycle Floating Chain Tube Kit

$ 20.00

Description

Product Description Overview:
The Floating Chain tube Holder solves a lot of problems that come alongside the joys of chain tube ownership. Have chain tube noise problems? Have chain tube drag problems? Have chain tube mounting problems? Well, the diabolically simple and sturdy Floating Chain tube Holder laughs in the face of problems like these. Add in one of our special low noise, extra slippery, virtually indestructible plastic TerraCycle chain tubes and you'll never worry about your chain again!

FAQ

1. What exactly is this thing?

It's a way to hold a chaintube in place on a chain, in a way that lets the chaintube float up, down, and sideways with the chain while staying in position front to back. The idea is that the chaintube only rides lightly on the chain, covering the chain where it needs to be covered, and keeping the chain from going crazy without dragging on it in normal operations.

2. OK, I get it, but how does it work?

As it turns out, the heart of the mount is diabolically simple- it's a section of bicycle chain, turned sideways. Really. After looking high and low for all sorts of industrial materials to accomplish this action, we came back to bike chain. It worked the best of all, but it needed something to make it prettier and keep it from touching things it shouldn't. So we hid it away and protected it from rubbing on anything with a nylon packcloth sleeve.

What makes it all work is the laser cut stainless L brackets attached to each end. One attaches to your bike, and the other attaches to the chaintube.  In the most common configuration, both ends attach with a pair of zipties. We also have an alternative configuration where one end attaches with a Cateye clamp. While the Cateye clamp could go on either end, most people usually put in the bike frame side.

3. Tell me more about mounting. For instance, where do I put it?

 The first consideration is where the chaintube needs to be. Generally, that's where the chain goes close to your fork, or the crossarm of your trike, or some other part of your frame. Where the mount goes depends on what is within the reach of the flexible chain assembly. It has a reach of 4.5 inches (11.4cm), so there are probably lots of places it will work. The chaintube can be attached anywhere along it's length (front, back, middle, etc.).

If the place on the frame where you are attaching the mount is at a very different angle than the chain, the L brackets are designed to be adjusted by bending to get the matching angle.

There are notches in the stainless L brackets to catch the zipties so everything stays secure. We put foam cushioning tape on the frame side L bracket to protect your paint.

4. Can I use any chain tube, like the tube I already have?

Yes. We recommend using a low noise, soft, slippery plastic. The material we use is quiet, slippery, and very abrasion resistant. Flaring the ends helps with noise quite a bit.

5. It seems crazy that such a simple thing could be the solution to my noisy chaintubes!

Yes, it does. There are some other things you don't want to overlook, like the type of material the chaintube is made out of, and keeping the tube as short as you reasonably can, but yes, this is often the key missing piece to finally making your chaintubes quiet.

More Details
Chaintubes have a reputation for being noisy, draggy, and prone to filling with chain crud. While this can be true, it doesn't have to be. We think that it's possible to have a chaintube that is very quiet, almost friction free, and unlikely to get gunked up. Here's how to do it:

1. Let the chaintube float with the chain. You want the chaintube to cover the chain, not tell it where to go.

2. Use the right chaintube material. We use a special low noise, extra slippery plastic.

3. Keep the chaintube as short as possible. The longer the tube, the more it will gunk up and the more the chain can vibrate inside. Shorter is better, down to about 75mm (3in).

4. Flare the ends. The entry end is most important, of course, but the exit end makes a big difference too. We flare both ends with a special process that thickens the ends and shapes them for smooth chain flow.